Academy – Math, Science & Technology Department

Math, Science & Technology

Department Overview

The Math, Science, and Technology department includes a wide array of subjects and disciplines. Our courses are designed to ground our students with solid knowledge and skills in various fields. The curriculum meets the requirements of the Washington State Superintendent of Public Instructions for high school graduation. In addition, we offer various honors and AP classes for students who wish to advance.

Our philosophy is one of bringing a biblical worldview into these subjects. 
We boldly address questions and discourse and help our students think through important topics. We introduce them in the sciences to intelligent design and other faith-affirming approaches, while preparing students for college and beyond.

Department Chair

Mike Sandefur

Math, Science & Technology Chair

Email Mike Sandefur

Mathematics

Advanced Math/Trigonometry (Full Year)

High School

A full year course including solving equations and inequalities, trigonometric functions, identities and graphs, polar coordinates, logarithms, sequences and series and pre-calculus.




Mathematics

Algebra I (Full Year)

High School

A full year course including: the basics of Algebra; solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities; solving and graphing quadratic equations; factoring polynomials; and working with radical and rational expressions and equations.




Mathematics

Algebra II (Full Year)

High School

A full year course including: solving equations and inequalities, polynomials and quadratic functions, rational expressions, sequences and series and trigonometry.




Mathematics

AP Calculus (Full Year)

High School

Topics include a brief review of polynomials, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, followed by discussion of limits, derivatives, and applications of differential calculus to real-world problem areas.




Mathematics

Geometry (Full Year)

High School

A full year course which examines the basics of geometry; developing inductive and deductive reasoning skills; problem solving using proofs; working with lines, angles, polygons, and circles; and working with perimeter, area, surface area and volume of figures and solids. The students will gain insight into logic and thinking skills as well as develop strategies for problem solving.




Science

Advanced Human Biology (Full Year)

High School

This advanced biology course study with emphasis on the concepts and themes from biology integrated and pertinent to the human body. Both the anatomy and the physiology of the human body’s 11 organ systems will be studied in detail. This course is designed as a good introduction to those interested in medical careers. Students will participate in a series of three dissections beginning with a cow eye, cow heart, and culminating with the dissection of the fetal pig. After successfully completing this course, students will be able to identify the individual functions of the body systems and distinguish how each system interacts with others to create the seamless integration that makes up the functioning human body. Students will be able to apply the body’s engineering to the amazing design of our Creator. Prerequisite: 2+ years of sciences.




Science

AP Chemistry (Full Year)

High School

First year chemistry is a pre-requisite for this course, and it is recommended that a student take AP Chemistry directly after taking first year Chemistry. This course is designed to be a college level course covering the topics and instruction directed by the national college board. Much of the work involves solving math type story problems, and students must have taken an advanced math course or be enrolled in one at the same time they take AP Chemistry. Students will receive at least 30-45 minutes of homework per night. The AP exam occurs in May; April is used for intense preparation for the test. The last month of school will be much less intense and generally will be used to study topics that match the interests of students. Prerequisite: Must have completed Algebra II and Chemistry. This class may not be offered every year.




Science

AP/Honors Physics (Full Year)

High School

Physics covers the topics of Kinematics, Newton's Laws, Energy and Work, Impulse and Momentum, and basic circuits and electricity saturated with a Biblical worldview. Students will need a good operating knowledge of Algebra II and Trigonometry math processes. Physics requires students to apply these math skills to real world situations using higher-level problem solving skills most often in a “story problem” or lab format. AP Physics is a much more rigorous course and is aligned with the College Board standards. Prerequisite: Must have completed Algebra II. This class may not be offered every year.




Science

Biology (Full Year)

High School

Biology is a laboratory science that covers the study of living things. Students will develop an understanding of the organic world by examining three units of study. The Science of Life includes topics such as cellular biology, genetics, and other material that concerns philosophy and theory. The Science of Organisms surveys the major groups of living things on our planet including the classification of organisms, disease and disorders, and ecology. The Study of Human Life involves the study of human anatomy and physiology.




Science

Chemistry (Full Year)

High School

Students develop a full operating knowledge of the interaction of matter and energy, learn about atoms, elements, our physical environment; all inside of a Biblical worldview. Chemistry requires an operating knowledge of Algebra I and Geometry and the ability to apply them to science concepts. Chemistry covers the major concepts in inorganic and basic organic chemistry. Must be enrolled in Geometry or higher (Algebra II recommended).




Science

Environmental Science (Full Year)

High School

The goal of the Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The overall goal is to prepare students to have a confident Biblical worldview in Environmental Science and be able to give a reason for the hope they have in Christ when challenged from a scientific perspective.




Science

Physical Science (Full Year)

High School

This course provides a good working knowledge of the basic laws and concepts in the physical environment, including key aspects of physics and chemistry. This class requires a good working knowledge of basic math skills. This class incorporates labs and projects into the learning process. The overall goal is to prepare students to have a confident Biblical worldview in physical science and be able to give a reason for the hope they have in Christ when challenged from a scientific perspective.




Occupational Education

High School

The structure of the activities will introduce the engineering design process used by scientists and engineers in many industries. Each project starts with a design brief explaining the challenge, uses videos of robots in action to make real-world connections, and culminates in a final project that can be shared and presented. Throughout the process, students gain and use knowledge of science, technology, and mathematics as they engineer a solution. This structure is designed to help students develop the 21st-century, creative-thinking, problem-solving, teamwork, and communication skills required for success in school and beyond.




Occupational Education

AP Computer Science (Full Year)

High School

The AP Computer Science Principles course is designed to be equivalent to a first semester introductory college computing course. In this course students will develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize and draw conclusions from trends. The course is unique in its focus on fostering student creativity. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them. They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society and the world.




Occupational Education

Communications (Semester)

High School

Communication Class presents theories and exercises in verbal and non-verbal communication with a focus on interpersonal relationships in everyday life and business. Creative thinking and problem solving with verbal, non-verbal, and written communications skills will be emphasized in a "business model". In the entirety of the class, emphasis will be placed on our communicative God that created us in His image to be communicators of His life, salvation, and love. Student will be exposed to community leaders who come on campus and share about a variety of communication methods used in the workplace.




Occupational Education

Digital Photography (Semester)

High School

Students will learn the basics of photography, including common errors, composition, lighting, special effects, and more. Students will learn how to use their camera, edit images, and compose excellent photographs. They will apply these skills in various projects as 4x6 prints and themed collages.




Occupational Education

Into to Computer Science (Semester)

High School

Exploring Computer Science (ECS) is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of
computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Rather than focusing
the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is
designed to focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain
tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. The goal of Exploring Computer
Science is to develop in students the computational practices of algorithm development, problem
solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s
students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers,
and societal and ethical issues.




Occupational Education

Personal Finance (Semester)

High School

Students will learn personal finance through an engaging and age-appropriate video series taught by Dave Ramsey. The program, which meets state standards and national guidelines, includes a comprehensive student workbook. Areas of study include planning and money management where students will learn to organize personal finances and use a budget to manage cash flow; credit and debt where students will learn how to maintain credit-worthiness, borrow at favorable terms, and manage debt; risk management and insurance where students will learn to use appropriate and cost-effective risk management strategies; and saving and investing where students will learn how they can implement a diversified investment strategy that is compatible with personal goals.




Occupational Education

Robotics (Semester)

High School

The structure of the activities will introduce the engineering design process used by scientists and engineers in many industries. Each project starts with a design brief explaining the challenge, uses videos of robots in action to make real-world connections, and culminates in a final project that can be shared and presented. Throughout the process, students gain and use knowledge of science, technology, and mathematics as they engineer a solution. This structure is designed to help students develop the 21st-century, creative-thinking, problem-solving, teamwork, and communication skills required for success in school and beyond.




Occupational Education

Speech (Semester)

High School

Speech Class introduces the principles of public speaking and provides the opportunity for students to orally present an introductory, personal experience/testimonial, informative, demonstration, persuasive, storytelling, impromptu, special occasion, and debate speeches. Topics include the principle of reasoning, audience analysis, collection of materials, outlining, and delivery. Emphasis in on the oral presentation of well-prepared speeches. In the entirety of the class, emphasis will be placed on our communicative God that created us in His image to be communicators of His life, salvation, and love. "Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their news, that it may benefit those who listen." Eph. 4:29 (NIV)




Occupational Education

Yearbook Design (Full Year)

High School

In Yearbook, students are responsible for the creation and organization of the school yearbook. The methods used to accomplish this task include (but are not limited to): class discussion, computer technology, photography, page layout and design, research, writing, and interpersonal communication skills. Emphasis is placed on effort, communication, and on meeting deadlines. Students must complete an application available from the journalism adviser. Class size is limited. Course objectives include accurately recording the history of the school year and glorifying God in all aspects of the production of the book.